A historical environment where students learn to change the future: part 2

December 18, 2018

From its origins dating back to Norman times of around the year 1150 the building of Leicester Castle Business School has a varied and interesting history.

 

DMU’s Leicester Castle Business School resides in the Great Hall of Leicester Castle, which is thought to be the oldest surviving aisled and bay-divided timber in Britain today.

 

We broke down the history of the globally renowned business school’s home.

 

1066 William the Conqueror invaded England.

 

1068 Leicester was captured by the Normans and given to Hugh de Grentemesnil, a trusted and powerful follower of William. A motte and bailey castle was constructed of wood, with the earthwork of the motte (mound) all that remains.

 

1093 Hugh’s son Ivo became keeper of the castle but staged a rebellion and was heavily fined. He pledged his lands to Robert de Beaumont in return for financial assistance. Robert was a powerful nobleman who fought at the Battle of Hastings and was renowned for his wise counsel to three successive kings of England. After becoming the 1st Earl of Leicester in 1107, Robert began work replacing the wooden castle with a more permanent structure of stone and lead.

 

1118 Robert’s son Robert de Bossu (“the Hunchback”) inherited the title. It is likely that he began construction of the great stone hall that forms the core of the castle today.

 

1173 The castle was used as a residence by the Earls of Leicester and saw violence during the revolt against Henry II.

 

1204 On the death of Earl Robert Fitz-Parnell the land was given to his sister Amice, Countess of Leicester, who was married to Simon de Montfort (senior).

 

1207 the de Montfort lands in England and France were seized to settle a debt.

 

1231 Simon de Montfort (junior) was able to reclaim the land and become Earl of Leicester.

 

1263 de Montfort famously raised a rebellion against the King, which culminated in his death at the Battle of Evesham in 1265. His titles and lands were forfeit and Leicester was given to Edmund Crouchback, Earl of Lancaster, Derby and Leicester, the son of King Henry III.

Please reload

Recent Posts
Please reload

Archive
Please reload